Heritage

The Gaumont’s stunning façade has been sensitively renovated, preserving unique Art Deco details and embellishments. The brand new interior has been sustainably crafted to the highest contemporary specifications, evolving the incredible story of The Gaumont on the King’s Road for a new generation.

Creativity and innovation are built into the fabric of the King’s Road: Home to artists, Bohemians, and birthplace of the moving image in the 19th Century, to site of major cultural movements of the 20th Century - swinging 60’s London, punks and Sloane Rangers. Inspiration is born of the area and encapsulated in the architecture and spirit of The Gaumont.

Architecture

The 1934 Gaumont building was heavily influenced by a Bauhaus aesthetic, lightened with Art Deco detailing - bronze figures, fretwork panels and the iconic three roundrels; the central featuring William Friese Greene, inventor of the moving image.

The Transformation

The original features have been restored and take centre stage in the new development - see the transformation here:

HERITAGE

1871

James McNeill Whistler paints “Nocturne: Blue and Silver - Chelsea”

This is the first of Whistler’s Nocturnes. In these works Whistler aimed to convey a sense of the beauty and tranquility of the Thames by night

1830

The King’s Private Road becomes public

Built in the late 1600’s, The King’s Road was used by King Charles II to travel between his palaces in St. James’s, Hampton Court and later, at Kew

1897

Bram Stoker publishes classic story “Dracula”

Bram Stoker, the author of the famous graphic novel, Dracula lived in various properties across Chelsea throughout his lifetime

1891

William Friese-Greene films one of the first motion pictures

Film pioneer William Friese-Greene filmed one of the earliest motion pictures on The King’s Road called “‎Traffic in King’s Road”

1934

Gaumont Palace
opens to customers

Originally opened as Gaumont Palace Cinema, it is now the setting of our very own “The Gaumont”. It was built on the site of the studios and laboratory of film pioneer William Friese-Greene and designed by architects William E. Trent and Ernest F. Tully.

1960 onwards

The “Swinging 60’s”

The King’s Road became
the home for art, music and
design in the 60’s and was
the birthplace of the 20th
Century’s most iconic cultural
and fashion movements.

Today

The iconic King’s Road

An aspirational destination and home to a vibrant community, with an abundance of independent shops, galleries and restaurants spiritual home of British creativity, risqué style, and excitement, it is one of the worlds most famous shopping and lifestyle destinations.

1830

The King’s Private Road becomes public

Built in the late 1600’s, The King’s Road was used by King Charles II to travel between his palaces in St. James’s, Hampton Court and later, at Kew

1871

James McNeill Whistler paints “Nocturne: Blue and Silver - Chelsea”

This is the first of Whistler’s Nocturnes. In these works Whistler aimed to convey a sense of the beauty and tranquility of the Thames by night

1897

Bram Stoker publishes classic story “Dracula”

Bram Stoker, the author of the famous graphic novel, Dracula lived in various properties across Chelsea throughout his lifetime

1891

William Friese-Greene films one of the first motion pictures

Film pioneer William Friese-Greene filmed one of the earliest motion pictures on The King’s Road called “‎Traffic in King’s Road”

1934

Gaumont Palace
opens to customers

Originally opened as Gaumont Palace Cinema, it is now the setting of our very own “The Gaumont”. It was built on the site of the studios and laboratory of film pioneer William Friese-Greene and designed by architects William E. Trent and Ernest F. Tully.

1960 onwards

The “Swinging 60’s”

The King’s Road became
the home for art, music and
design in the 60’s and was
the birthplace of the 20th
Century’s most iconic cultural
and fashion movements.